Stealing the Empire

eaI have written a couple of times about the issue of mission thieves on Empire Avenue.  I was really thrilled when Duleepa Dups Wijayawardhana, the CEO of Empire Avenue, participated in the discussion.  He counseled patience but assured us that they were working on a solution.

I was super hopeful, when EA added a warning to every mission screen, “We monitor link claiming. Only claim Missions where you will complete the task, your karma is important! ”  I did have an aesthetic question about the warning being in pink, but perhaps they were taking a queue from Arpaio.  When that first showed up, I expected that a placebo effect would change behavior for a while.  I also worried that without enforcement the impact would rapidly wear away.  I think my concerns were well placed.

Now it seems that most missions carry some threat or warning.  I hear that a lot of folks are blocking the miscreants and growling at them in various forums.  The newest trend seems to be publishing the names of the offenders.  I even saw a Fresh Face player published a list of mission thieves.  I am a bit concerned about this trend.  I see enough confusing missions and even some that are intentionally misleading to wonder about the consequences.

I worry about the negativity that seems to be rising on the Avenue.  What do you think?  Are you publishing a list of mission thieves?  Are you on any of the lists?  Can mission creators really make a difference by monitoring their own missions?   Is this junk making Empire Avenue less fun or useful?  Is this a long term trend, or just a bump in the Avenue?  Can or will the folks who own the Avenue help us control the creeps?

No answers from me today, but I would surely be interested in what you think.

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

53 thoughts on “Stealing the Empire

  1. BTW Joe Arpaio is the Sheriff of Phoenix. He makes county inmates wear pink clothes.

  2. Harold, I’m right there with you as far as being concerned about … well about the eaves vigilantes. I have seen movements like this in other medium and it never ends well. Ever.

    I see the self-appointed sheriffs as a far greater concern than the eves thieves, who can be immediately blocked. Only thing I can do is vote with my feet and not do the missions from folks who issue threats guised as warnings – in fact I have considered blocking those people outright, lest I somehow find my way into their crosshairs.

    • Thanks for your input Casey. I think folks are getting frustrated and feeling powerless to stop the thieves. They are not thinking very clearly about the impact of their actions on the community. It is tough to fix it if you incorrectly publish someone as a thief.

      • I think back to when I ran my first mission and dutifully went back to see who had ‘ripped me off’. As it turns out I falsely identified a well-respected member for ‘stealing’ my eves. Thank goodness I did not act on the information. It was not too long before I realized that virtually any energy spent hunting eves thieves is wasted. (not to say I don’t block repeat offenders; I certainly do. I just do so quickly and quietly and move on. The same holds true for those with other odious behaviors, like selling after receiving a buyback or poor conduct in chat/shoutouts.)

  3. Jeanne Lynn says:

    That’s a very thought provoking post and I’m glad you posted it because I’ve been thinking about this situation a lot lately. I also saw the Fresh Face’s list of alleged mission thieves yesterday. Several of the people on the list were known mission thieves, but some of the people were well-established players with great reputations. I didn’t know what to think. I was disturbed by it, to say the least.

    The paranoia levels are soaring and it makes me nervous. This is something that Empire Avenue needs to address before it gets out of control. First, EA needs to put a “refund eaves” button on the missions. That way, if someone clicks and can’t fulfill their obligation, they have a way to make good on the situation other than using the reward money to invest in the mission holder. We’ve probably all clicked on a “like page, ” “twitter follow,” or “Vote” mission and realized that we’d already done it. It would be nice to have a way to return the reward for someone else to claim under those circumstances.

    The other day, I went to invest in someone who’s user name was written down in my EA notebook,, only to discover that the person had blocked me. I was shocked as I make sure I perform missions with integrity and over-deliver with extra likes, shares, favoriting a retweet ect. Did this person,think I was a mission thief? Maybe I’m on a “bad” list and don’t know it? As I try to everything right on EA, this really hurt my feelings.

    I’m honestly thinking of avoiding doing missions for players who post ominous warnings in their title or description. Some mission holders are so paranoid now that it makes you not even want to deal with them because you could end up accused or on a list. It’s too easy to make a mistake or have the internet go down when you are in the middle of doing a mission.

    The worst part is well-known mission thieves are never banned. One thief is on every single Wall of Shame and every day, I watch him in the sidebar, stealing the eaves from dozens and dozens of missions. I’ve only run 4 or 5 missions and he’s stolen from every single one of them. And he’s just allowed to continue doing this without any repercussions. Players like that are the reason everyone is so paranoid.

    Mission thievery is getting to be a very big problem on Empire Avenue. Empire Avenue is a wonderful and extremely fun site. It’s a real shame to see all of this negativity.

    • “Ominous warnings” — thanks Jeanne, that is precisely the term I was looking for. You hit the nail right on the head.

      • Jeanne Lynne I hear you loud and clear. Thieves at EA is a big problem however if someone is known to be honest and that person takes the eaves without completing a mission, before blocking, give that person the benefit of the doubt and contact him/her. Let me tell you. Many times I am on EA doing missions from my iPhone and most of the time I complete missions successfully however. the odd time I land on a site that is not mobile friendly.. then I can’t complete the mission. Heck I cannot even reinvest in them so I just comment on their page and explain what happened, tell them to tweet or FB me the link so I can complete it on my PC at a later time. I would say 9 times out of 10 they are understanding and give me the link..but one person so far blocked me. I was mad!! Sometimes things get into the way or if the phone rings before doing a mission but after claiming eaves, that can distract you. And yes it is true, you cannot remember if you voted for something either if you claim those eaves for a vote. However you can check to see the link below the claim tab if you have liked or followed a page previously.. we dont always remember to do that. However, the ones who don’t deserve the benefit of the doubt are those who take a Facebook mission and don’t even have a Facebook profile or page connected to the network… that is a blatant sign of a thief and deserves blocking.

  4. Thanks for your response Jeanne. You captured my concern exactly. I am afraid that with all the finger pointing folks will just quit to avoid dealing with the jerks on either side of the issue.

    Missions are the strength of Empire Avenue, but they are becoming the Achilles heal.

  5. I hate to say it Harold but I’ve just given up. I run painfully simple 5k missions for shareholders only and I don’t even bother to look and see who may have done a runner. The ‘Report’ button does nothing useful and it’s just not even worth my time anymore to send messages to people asking why they didn’t do the mission. If Dups and the crew at EA don’t care enough to implement an actual solution when it’s one of the most talked about subjects in the groups, forget it. Between thieves and inflation the missions are going to die off anyway for anyone using EA for business purposes then it’s just going to become just another game for me to stop playing.

    • Thanks Jeff & I am sorry to agree with much of what you say. When I started, not that long ago, missions were great. I was always learning some new technology, getting exposed to new ideas, and running into a bunch of passionate and great folks. I am starting to feel like I need a shower after I get done with EA to wash off the slime.

    • Jeff’s post regarding EAV inflation and thieves also concern me. I’m just starting to get a good daily income where I >can< run some decent missions. When I started out last year, payouts weren't as high as they are now.

      At this point, I'm mostly working on establishing a rapport with people that I perceived to be leaders/reputable, establish ties and start doing buys. I'm thinking that shareholder missions may be the best thing to do at this point.

  6. Teri Gidwitz says:

    I’m with Jeff. I don’t run many missions, and if I do going forward, they will be for shareholders or within private communities where I am a member, where there is some aspect of things being mutually beneficial. Keeps the riff raff out. It’s a sad fact of life on EA.

  7. You are right Teri, but it is sad. Missions were & should be a great way to engage new folks. I am not sure the Avenue survives if everyone holes up in their own cliques.

  8. V. says:

    Good article, Harold, again. Also, good comments, from all of the commentators. Everyone has something to put on the table.

    Besides of the mission cheaters there are two more things I don’t understand in this entire mess. The first is EA. I can’t understand why they don’t police this better. It is their business and mission cheaters are threatening it. There can be a huge “rats tale” of problems attached to this for EA. Not only that people get sick and tired of running missions. But it is their business and I am sure they are running it as they find it appropriate.

    The other thing that stuns me every time when I start barking about the cheaters is that they always have support from all kind of folks out on the avenue. Why that is, is beyond me.

    If you run a number of missions every day like I do, and many others, you will get p… at these poor kleptomaniacs no matter how poor of souls they are. And if you tell yourself you won’t get mad this time, it will hit you again sooner or later. That someone gets mad at me for making an attempt to make it better, I can’t understand. One thing is for sure, sitting there and do and say nothing but much rather support the cheaters, will not change anything. Remember all the nice Facebook quotes we all share and like and comment on? You are guilty if you don’t do anything, say anything… in that sense. You know what I mean.

    Without knowing it for sure, I would say I probably ran about a 1,000 – 1,500 missions so far. While knowing that almost every mission has a number of cheaters, I maybe have checked on 50 for completion. In my opinion, that shows patience with the problem. When I checked, I sent messages to these people and waited for responses. The best I got out of them was a lame excuse why the mission went down. To be fair, in 2 or 3 cases I got a good explanation and things were fine. If I don’t get a note back, or the excuse is too ridiculous, I block them. I have reported one so far, recently. While I have threatened to call out cheaters, I haven’t done it, yet. The only reason that holds me back is I have no time for the nonsense that follows.

    I am one of the people that shot out some warnings. The result is that the cheating is far less than it was, and the quality of mission takers has increased. The number of takers has decreased. Closing a mission out takes longer now. I assume that I’ve lost the cheaters, their friends and those that are afraid of me or believe I am out of my mind. BTW, I am not out of my mind and I am the nicest guy around. If you don’t believe it, get to know me. I am open for face time, phone calls, hangouts or whatever you prefer. If you want to block people that try to fight the cheaters, I offer you to speak with me first. That might give you a completely new view of things.

    • Thanks for your reply Vitus. I surely understand the difficulty that the mission thieves create. I have reported & blocked many. It frustrates me to watch the bad guys also. Please don’t think anything in my post excuses their bad behavior.

      I am concerned about the threats and warnings that seem to accompany almost every mission. I think that it creates a culture of negativity that reduces Empire Avenue, but I find that point to be a bit debatable & could certainly agree to disagree amicably. My larger concern with individuals trying to police things ourselves is a question of efficacy. Several folks have said that the warnings reduce the number of thieves. That is great, but I suspect it might be temporary. Even worse is the time wasted by mission creators policing and dealing with those creeps. Instead of dealing with those idiots, you could be engaging with the great folks on the Avenue like me.

      We should be able to spend our time on the Avenue pleasantly and productively. We ought to be able to focus on encouraging folks to do our missions. Empire Avenue should be a place where folks can learn,grow, build, create, and celebrate together.

  9. V. says:

    Harold, you are one of the people I mean when I say quality has increased. With less cheaters I have more quality people reaching the mission. That this is temporary I have experienced multiple times when i shot warnings. And so it will be/is this time.

    While I responded to your post and the comments, I ran a “clean out” mission and got rolled over royally. The mission had no warning, so the kleptomaniacs served themselves. Go check out my missions. I just collected the “evidence”, which was very easy in this case. With this in hand, EA should actually kick them off the platform. Since EA won’t do it, I had to sent the cheaters a note. I bet I won’t get a response from any of them.

    So, tomorrow I will attach a warning again and some people will get mad at me because I warn cheaters. Honestly, does that make any sense? When i walk through the suburbs, I see a dog warning sign on every other fence. Nobody complains.

    I agree with you, it doesn’t look good when you go and do missions and every other mission has a warning or note in regards to cheating. Those that are in the game long enough and don’t support the cheaters will find it not so much disturbing as some of the new players.

    The thing is, social media is people business. In people business you will always have some idiots running around, just like in real life. After all, we are all from real life, aren’t we?

    We should have a talk, Harold. Let me know if that is ok with you.

    • Thanks Vitus.

      I am not sure that we disagree much. I just am looking for affirmative solutions to the problem. I hope someone comes up with a brilliant, simple, easy, cheap, quick, agreeable solution, but I suspect this will require time, software development, and personnel resources from EA to solve.

      I look forward to chatting. I will send you a message in a bit.

  10. I stopped bothering about thieves, it creates too much negative energy in both the game and in myself. Instead of WANTING something out of a mission (better Klout score, more likes and views etc.) I started creating missions that I consider a gift. When I see a nice post on Facebook, or an event I think people can benefit from, or an inspirational video, I create a mission. So that mission becomes a gift. People that are able to RECEIVE gifts, do the mission. In the end, they do it for themselves. Thieves will stay thieves, beggers, left with empty hands.

    • I think that is a great attitude Elza, but perhaps a bit more of a wish than reality from where I sit. I tweeted a reply to you that said: All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing. attributed to Edmund Burke. I worry that we become complicit in bad acts if we enable the bad actors. Although I trust that evil ones have a paucity of spirit, I know of many with large bank accounts.

      Civil society must have rules and enforcement of those rules to function safely. Although you & I may have enough EA wealth to give away eaves without concern, I know many that use hard earned eaves to accomplish important goals. The thieves damage the opportunity promised by EA to those folks. I believe this damages the value & the fun of participating in Empire Avenue. Good people are quitting in frustration. That diminishes us all.

  11. […] I have written a couple of times about the issue of mission thieves on Empire Avenue. I was really thrilled when Duleepa Dups Wijayawardhana, the CEO of Empire Avenue, participated in the discussi…  […]

  12. Just change the way you think about missions (expecting something from missions, or treat them as gifts) and the thieves are no longer in your way! http://confluencemedia.com/2013/there-are-no-empire-avenue-missions-thieves

    • Elza, I agree that folks will find a solution to the problem, but I suspect quitting the game is the more likely answer for most.

      • Chris Sandys says:

        Before I would consider opening the doors to thieves by stating: “Take what you want, you’re not stealing, I’m giving it to you,” I would quit.

        Changing my view to that of me-giving versus them-taking doesn’t change the fact that I am paying for something and not getting the utility I bargained for in return.

        Why would I ever associate with a society where corruption and theft is openly tolerated?
        I wouldn’t, I think anyone who does gets exactly what they deserve.

  13. I think something needs to be done to block the thieves. However it happened to me twice that I did a mission and it did not show that I had completed it already. So i did some other RT and bought shares in the person.

    • AJ I find a big difference between someone who tries to do a mission and runs into something compared to the massive, repeated, evil & intentional thievery. Some mission creators are rotten also. That is why I think EA management has to get involved to solve this one.

  14. Johnny Wood says:

    Thanks for the article Harold….great discussion happening here. I have noticed eave-thievery on some of my missions and it’s disconcerting to say the least.

    I’m relatively new to EA, but in my very humble opinion if someone takes the time to ‘tag’ you on EA as an eaves thief then it’s probably more likely that you did it than not. That being said– I can also see how people could abuse this too, and I certainly wouldn’t want to be falsely accused by anyone. However, if someone posts the names of the alleged thieves they are putting themselves out in the open and making themselves a target IF they are lying. As things stand now I’m much more likely to get hit by eaves thieves repeatedly on every mission than to get falsely accused by someone of being a thief myself…esp because I NEVER steal, and if I make a mistake I let you know in 10 different ways that I’ll make it up to you.

    I have been an active member of other social websites where there is a collective “burden of proof” that the community places on the accuser in these situations, but that is something that has to be cultivated organically as a community. In other words we can’t just ask everybody on EA to start thinking this way.

    Seems the only solution would be for the folks at EmpireAvenue to take this issue more seriously. Hopefully they do because I’m just getting started!

    -Johnny
    (e)JOHNNYWOOD
    http://xeeme.com/JohnnyWood

    • Thanks Johnny. I think you are exactly right. It is an intriguing idea to cultivate a culture to help manage this issue. I am going to think a bit more about what we could do to encourage that.

  15. Sean Foreman says:

    Yes, yes. This is quite the concern. I’m fairly new to EAv. What I’ve done when I began is try my best to invest in those who got me started (which was a lot of people).

    When I built myself up to be able to do missions, I spent nearly all of my remaining eaves to setup my first mission. It is definitely disheartening to see only two of the six that claimed eaves actually performed the mission.

    At first, I blamed myself, assuming I wasn’t specific enough, but I see that this is a problem for just about everyone. I think the only way I think we can try combat this is to just monitor who claims without action and block them personally, rather than add them to a list which obviously can be abused to tarnish reputable EAv’ers. If enough brick walls are put up, this should stop the thievery in time.

    • Sean thanks for your response. I think that a well crafted mission will get better completion, but I have not figured out a way to stop the thieves. I hope that EA management has a plan.

  16. I think only blocking is a way against thieves and setting the qualification for doing you missions higher (shareholder only, etc.), but building a shield against thieves will have no success, you can find them everywhere.

    And keep in mind: “It’s only a game” where you can benefit from!

    • Walter I appreciate your input. I guess that I hope we can do better; at least I hope that EA can do better.

      YouTube missions can already be done under control; so it is virtually impossible to cheat. EA only missions like share buys, recommend, or endorse could be controlled by EA also. With the implementation of OAuth, they theoretically could do similar stuff with Twitter & Facebook. I think an option for a for a delay between doing the mission and receiving payment to allow the mission creator to challenge an incomplete mission might also help.

      It is a game, but I think it is important for some. I hope we can find a way to get the most benefit possible for everyone.

  17. Great post and comments from everyone. I have pretty much come to expect at least 30% breakage on any mission I create. If you think about it, that’s a lot of cheaters! I try not to think about it too much because I have met so many wonderful people who go above and beyond. I’d hate for our community to lose any one of these folks out of frustration over cheating, so I think EA needs to step up beyond what they have done. And yes, we need to expunge anyone who runs a shady or grossly inappropriate mission. To me, that is worse than a stealer.

  18. Great topic, Harold!! I have to go back and read the rest of the comments. Mission thieves can be annoying. Hope Dupes, etc. come up with a solution. I also have been blocked and assumed that I was labeled a thief, though I am very conscientious about completing missions. The blocker still had me listed as a FB friend by the way.

    • Thanks Rich. It is sort of strange to be accused. Tough to know exactly how to sort it out. There are many poorly written missions where I am not sure exactly what they want done. I hope EA gets us some help soon.

  19. marcelaubron says:

    Thank you very much, Harold, for another engaging post and kudos to the commentators here – if this doesn’t show EA this is a) a serious issue and b) there are people out there willing to use EA to its fullest potential and therefore giving EA to run a business in the first place then I don’t know what else would.

    I’ve been holding back on missions when I did a few right at the beginning and about two or three out of ten simply didn’t followed my very simple suggestions – they were mostly about buying my shares or supporting friends of mine. And when I started looking out for similar situations with other players I quickly realised this is quite an issue and has been for some time.

    I still oscillate between doing my first “blaming mission” or continuing to be very cautious about doing missions at all. I have blocked players when it became clear they had stolen my eaves (always checked back with messages to the players in question) but there is nothing else I can do … and that is quite disconcerting.

    However, just as Harold said – there was a recent mission where people where blamed I consider trustworthy and supportive – and now I will have to find out whether this is true because otherwise the atmosphere which has been tremendously supportive and friendly in my first four months on EA may turn sour.

  20. Marcel thanks for your thoughtful reply. I think that getting the right balance between ridding the game of thieves, but not accusing everyone may be tricky. I don’t want EA to feel like a police state where folks are trying to pounce on every mistake. I wrote the post because I was beginning to feel the atmosphere change and hoped to help.

  21. Melanie says:

    The mission system needs a change. I run missions because I could really use a hand in some things, but a lot of the people who “complete” the missions don’t do anything. It varies from mission to mission. Twitter missions have a good turnout rate, but social network missions specifically for tumblr or pinterest might have as low as a 10% complete rate (from my experience.)

    I understand that there can be accidents, especially with those really wordy missions that say something like “5000 eaves for a retweet” and then talk at length about what you’re to retweet and then somewhere in the explanation say that you also have to follow them and fave the tweet.

    I don’t say things like, “If you lie and steal eaves, I’m going to hunt you down”, but I do occasionally ask for honesty in completing the mission. It’s a turn off to see a mission that says something like, “I’ll burn your house down if you don’t complete the whole mission.”

    Like I said, the best turnout rate for me seems to be missions that have only one step: retweet this one thing.

    Anything with multiple steps are strenuous. If the person offering the eaves needs a lot of steps to be done, they should offer up a nice number of eaves. However, it’s really unfair for them to offer up a lot of eaves and then have to deal with really crappy turnout.

    As a person who regularly holds missions, I really wish people would actually do the missions. It’s a big problem. It really is. I don’t think a witch hunt is going to change it, though.

    -MELBEL

    • Thanks Melanie. I agree with you. I am just concerned that EA does not seem to have an appetite for solving the problem. That makes me sad; because I believe that it is damaging the system. Folks who are trying to do things right seem to be getting discouraged.

  22. In my opinion Empire Avenue is the saloon in the wild west called the internet. It’s where everything is up for sale, for a price, and he shoot outs are entertaining, but there is a no holds barred to taking out offenders when caught double dealing.

    Only recently, a chap waited all day for me to complete a facebook mission. How do I know he waited? The stream of messages on my eave wall, with tapping fingers, and discontent that I’d not completed the mission the moment I claimed it.

    I’m not a mission thief, but I have made mistakes, and maybe in this instant I’d not been timely or exacting enough in the execution. When I logged in at the end of my day, I was shocked to see he’d posted a blog outing me as a mission thief, with screen shots of my message, ‘done’. Into the bargain, he also stated he sold my shares as a punishment.

    Here’s the thing, if he had not checked my page to see how long I’ve been on the avenue, my connection scores, and my track record, we could have avoided the shoot out. He wasn’t a newbie, but not a long time player either. In my view, the only way anyone is going to survive on the Avenue is by following through, and making up for any mistakes along the way. (which I did in shovel loads with this *gentleman*.

    I take exception to is being publicly misrepresented, or my motives being impugned, but I
    don’t worry too much about mission thieves. Some days I have a good fulfilment, others it’s down.

    I can’t let it get to me, as it will interrupt my objectives; which is to build relationships, brand awareness and generally have fun being a bit unpredictable with my opinionated self.

    All the best Harold, and thanks for the opportunity to let off a bit of steam.

  23. In my opinion Empire Avenue is the saloon in the wild west called the internet. It’s where everything is up for sale, for a price, the shoot outs are entertaining, and there’s a no holds barred to taking out offenders when caught double dealing.

    Only recently, a chap waited all day for me to complete a facebook mission. How do I know he waited? The stream of messages on my eave wall, with tapping fingers, and discontent that I’d not completed the mission the moment I claimed it.

    I’m not a mission thief, but I have made mistakes, and maybe in this instant I’d not been timely or exacting enough in the execution. When I logged in at the end of my day, I was shocked to see he’d posted a blog outing me as a mission thief, with screen shots of my message, ‘done’. Into the bargain, he also stated he sold my shares as a punishment.

    Here’s the thing, if he had not checked my page to see how long I’ve been on the avenue, my connection scores, and my track record, we could have avoided the shoot out. He wasn’t a newbie, but not a long time player either. In my view, the only way anyone is going to survive on the Avenue is by following through, and making up for any mistakes along the way. (which I did in shovel loads with this *gentleman*.

    I take exception to is being publicly misrepresented, or my motives being impugned, but I
    don’t worry too much about mission thieves. Some days I have a good fulfilment, others it’s down.

    I can’t let it get to me, as it will interrupt my objectives; which is to build relationships, brand awareness and generally have fun being a bit unpredictable with my opinionated self.

    All the best Harold, and thanks for the opportunity to let off a bit of steam.

  24. I have noticed some members giving gifts to their large shareholders and then asking them to do something. I only do a few missions and they are to my share holders. I do block if I send a message and don’t get a response, then yes, I block. I reinvest into the person if something happens in a mission and I tell them something happened, my computer failed, twitter was down, whatever. I give them back the eaves.
    I do feel there should be a primer on missions because many times there are missions without warnings that I have found myself in and I will not complete. I give back to the creator by buying shares and explaining it was against my principals.

    Thanks Harold for a great post.

  25. Chris Sandys says:

    Here is a suggestion for a solution.

    This is absolutely nothing new. Empire Avenue is a tiny baby compared to eBay, where strangers complete missions for REAL money, and sometimes big money. For a great number of years, eBay was the largest facilitator of fraud on the internet. They have managed to fine-tune their feedback and policies to help weed-out abusers.

    The first step to their fine-tuning was to ***Cease turning a blind eye to the problem.**** eBay was on-track to failure, because purchasers no longer trusted sellers. The venture was going down. A lot of people don’t realize how badly their transaction numbers were plummeting.

    EA better figure this part out very quickly. You don’t need to be a rocket scientist; eBay already did all the heavy-thinking for you. If the founders are looking for a liquidity event, i.e. real cash, then they better fix the problem. Hint: If you wait until you see decreasing membership, then you’ve waited to long and your wallet is taking a hit.

    So how did eBay do it? They reformed how feedback was given, specifically, safeguards to diminish its abuse as a retaliatory tool. They allowed mission-givers to block mission-takers who didn’t fit certain criteria. In other words – the community largely vouched for the reliability for fellow members within criteria and policy created by the administrators. They also implemented a system whereby completion of missions could be verified.

    If EA is reading this and doesn’t understand – hire me as a consultant and you’ll have a vastly less corrupt, and more marketable, system within a couple of months. Do nothing – your game will fail and your years of work will make for an interesting Harvard Business School case study under the category of “Failure because they ignored the problem.”

  26. Chris Sandys says:

    Where I can find some of these Halls of Shame?

  27. George J Lloyd says:

    Excellent post Harold …. again… 🙂
    I am particullarly glad that you mention intentionally misleading missions by some creators. Mission thiefs are a problem, no doubt and we need a solution for that, but we shouldn’t forget about the good mission doers and there are many, you yourself are one of them. 🙂

    To answer your questions:
    I am too worried about the negativity that seems to be rising on the Avenue.

    I am not publishing a thieves list and I’m not aware of being on one.

    Unfortunately I must say, I feel less fun these days because of the negativity and junk. And I do spend less time on the Avenue.

    I hope very much this is just a hickup, but there is a warning voice at the back of my head that calls for reason and thinks it might be the beginning of the end, especially as I don’t think that thieves or malicious mission creators are the only problem that the Avenue is facing.

    Yes, the folks who own the Avenue will do their best to control the creeps? It’s in their interest, but it’s not an easy task and it wouldn’t be the first time that a great idea/site gets killed by wrong decissions of the managers. 🙂

    Thanks again Harold, I wish there would be more of your caliber on the Avenue.

  28. shakthi2013 says:

    Harold,

    You have a point here. But I am afraid that the self appointed name callers are doing more harm than good. There was a guy who had a mission pointing to a broken link. I promptly re-invested the eaves in him and left a shout, but he insisted on name calling and shouting on my profile. I had to report him and block him.

    I think that, Even if EA comes out with a solution, it should be one that festers connection and not animosity and disgruntlement in the community.

    Just my 2 cents

    ~Shakthi

    • Thanks for your reply Shakthi. That was exactly the point I was trying to make in my post. Individual efforts to reduce theft are certainly as much of a problem as the actual theft when you view the entire EA ecosystem. Inconsistencies, inaccuracies, incompetence and bad intent exist in both the giving and doing of missions. The system needs some support to reduce the friction and negativity.

  29. This is a tough one Harold. Thanks for addressing the problem. I don’t believe in a public “outing” of suspected offenders. Sometimes people make mistakes or the tech doesn’t work… I so appreciate your blog and all the responses. Great discussion on this topic!

  30. Luigi Cappel says:

    Very interesting debate. I didn’t realise so many people are doing it. Generally if I’m not sure if I can complete a mission, I won’t try. It could be a technology thing, although most of the time I dont use EA on my mobile, but another scenario might be where i dont necessarily agree with the page or topic that the person wants me to like. This means having to check it oujt first before agreeing to the mission. A button too give Eaves back is a good idea, but the problem clearly isn’t the person who innocently can’t complete a mission.

    • Thanks Luigi. Unfortunately the Avenue hosts some scoundrels also. I would like to be rid of them, but perhaps they provide valuable entertainment. Such are the travails of life.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: